Emily’s Triforce

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Hello, everyone. My name is Emily Trujillo & I am the daughter of Irvin & Lisa Trujillo, and the 24 year-old 8th generation Weaver. It took me so long to start this because I had what I like to call a ’24 year teenage rebellion.’ I grew up being asked if I was a tapestry artist by almost everyone, so out of angst I played around with almost every other art medium: from jewelry to watercolors, tape sculptures to Photoshop. What really helped me change my mind was my college career. One of my majors was ‘Ethnology,’ the study of culture, and it really made me appreciate my own heritage. Even if I decide to go to grad school instead of following my parents’ careers as tapestry artists, I came back to Chimayo to make sure Rio Grande Weaving doesn’t end at 7 generations, and hopefully pass it on to the 9th.

This is my first piece that got named ‘Emily’s Triforce’ by my mom. I sold it before I was even ready to sell it & I wasn’t even sure I wanted to. I showed it to someone before it was even photographed, and they asked to buy it & so I quickly shot a – sadly – warped picture so I at least had something. This piece meant a lot to me, not only because it was my first, but also because at the time I was weaving it I was getting ready for my first figure skating competition. I was skating to the theme of “Legend of Zelda: The Windwalker,” a video game I played with my brother as a kid. Because of this, I was listening to the soundtrack from Windwalker & other various Zelda games during the entire 7 hours it took me to weave this. In other words, it represents a particular slice of my life. The triangle in the center is like a Triforce, but since in the game there are islands & mountains you sail to, it represents the land surrounded by the seas you explore. This story is important to my introduction because I hope to learn the traditional styles & techniques but use them to create my own style, one that represents my generation. I am my own artist with my own personality & life story, and it will reflect in my pieces. I hope to one day create works of art like my parents & not let them down, but only time & hard work will get me there. We shall see.

Emily now has her own page on the CTA website: http://www.chimayoweavers.com/category/ET.html

Notes on demonstrating spinning at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival

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We were honored to be invited to participate in the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in the Arts and Industries Building on the National Mall in Washington DC.  We shipped a loom out for Irvin to weave on, but they borrowed a wheel for me that is just like the one I use at home.  I also brought a couple of scoured churro fleeces to spin during the weekend we were there.

Most folks don’t seem to know what spinning is,  what weaving is,  or what a spinning wheel or loom is.  People thought I was making thread, or maybe rope, working silk, weaving, knitting, or sewing.   For some reason, a number of people thought the churro wool looked like alpaca fiber.  Since these processes and tools are so removed from day-to-day life,  I guess this is all understandable.  Irvin was right by me, weaving, so at least I could point out the loom and ask them to observe the weaving process. All of this makes me think that fiber folks should be out in front of people more often.

There were, however,  people whose nostalgia about wool and spinning and looms very much affected them.  People with family or friends, or long-ago-and-far-away histories, that involve these things.   The mother and daughter from Thailand, the lady from Ethiopia whose family wasn’t privy to weaving or spinning skills, but who maybe she wished they had been.  The lady from India who was learning all about sprang.  People who really wanted to learn to spin.  Knitters and weavers who think maybe they’ll spin one day.   And some people who were just enthralled by the wheel and the seemingly magical process.

But the kids were the most fun.  The little ones were down at my level.  Some kids are too shy to speak to a stranger about that mysterious thing I was doing.   Lots of kids just stared.   There was a lot of confused information given to them by parents who wanted to explain things but didn’t really know themselves.

Some wanted to try it out.  (Uhh, might be frustrating for both of us.)  Some tried to touch the wheel while I was spinning.  (No way! That’s just dangerous.)  I let them feel the fleece, which looked a lot softer than it felt. That was when parents would touch too,  which was great.

My favorite kid encounter was with a boy who was maybe four or so, whose jaw dropped and   eyes shone.  He loved what he was seeing.  I like to think that somehow spinning is kinda magical and that’s what he was thinking too. He came back a couple of times, and made me very happy.  There’s always hope when that kind joy exists in the world.

On Planning Things Out

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The topic of sketching and planning our pieces comes up on a regular basis as I weave under the watchful eyes of our customers.  The philosophy that Jake Trujillo passed on to us regarding this was pretty clear.  Design at the loom and make each piece a unique work of art.

So I don’t often sketch things out before I weave. This comes from a long history of not liking pieces that I have thought through too much in advance. I find that basing my work on something I have drawn out on paper as opposed to basing it on what transpires at the loom tends to produce pieces that are awkward and stiff. Perhaps that is just my perception, or maybe it’s that I drew more pieces out when I was a less experienced weaver and not able to execute designs as well. But the philosophy that was passed to my by my husband and his father says that Chimayo designs are done at the loom, that designing is part of the weaving process.
When I am weaving in any of the traditional styles, I have some design decisions already made for me. Tradition will tell me a great deal about design placement and proportions. But that doesn’t mean I don’t have lots and lots of creative design decisions to be made. The question to consider here is when and how I will make those decisions.
I have to have an idea of what the proportions are going to be. This is one thing I often plan out on paper. If I’m weaving a Chimayo, I decide how much background I will start with, how big the stripes will be, what size designs I will be putting in and where they will go. The more I weave, the less I find myself spending time on this step. I can rely on weavings I have done in the past, and, to some degree, I remember the measurements I was happy with. Or I can draw a rough sketch indicating where to begin and end the different elements I will be weaving.
For a Chimayo-style piece I will not draw designs. I will be conscious of what I might want a base to be like before I start the design. I will probably be conscious of what colors will be predominant and what will be secondary or just highlights. I might have an idea of what kind of center design shape will predominate. I might consciously be aware of a new idea or concept I want to explore. But I might have pretty much no preconcieved notion of what a design will end up looking like. Chimayo absolutely has that kind of potential for spontaneity. And one more thing before I start weaving: I have to have an idea of what the proportions are going to be. This is one thing I often plan out on paper. I decide how much background, how big the stripes will be, what size designs I will be putting in and where they will go. The more I weave, the less I find myself spending time on this step.
The one motivation I have for sketching things out is that it might actually help me think about how I will actually weave something. Let’s say I want to have lines that interact in some way, as in, one line passing under another line. It will help me to have that drawn out. I may or may not actually follow the sketch when I get around to weaving it, but it will probably help me to have drawn it out.

 

Rio Grande Saltillos

 

When Irvin and Lisa Trujillo got married, they went up to Santa Fe for their honeymoon. Not a great distance from Albuquerque, but nevertheless it was an important choice. They went to see a museum show about Saltillo weavings. Remember that Lisa was about to start her life as a professional weaver, and that Irvin had been weaving since he was a child. But neither of them had seen Saltillo weavings before. The show convinced them both that they were going to have to weave in this style.

Classic Saltillo
A classic 19th-century Mexican Saltillo weaving

These beautiful textiles originated in Mexico.  They are very finely woven tapestries, with a border, vertically oriented  background design and serrated center diamond.  Some of the classic Saltillos have what is described as a lozenge shape as opposed to the diamond shape in the center. The Saltillos were owned by the wealthy elite landowners of the time, the hacenderos.  When Mexico gained independendence from Spain, the Saltillos were a symbol of national pride.

The wealth that produced these fine textiles in Mexico did not exist in New Mexico.  But the Governor of New Mexico in 1807 invited two weaving experts to come north with the aim of improving textile production.  The Bazan brothers are credited with bringing the Saltillo style and the tapestry techniques needed to produce them, to New Mexico.

We call the New Mexico version, Rio Grande Saltillos.  They have never been produced in large numbers, but we are aware of a few different recognizable variations.  One thing that they seem to all share is that they have vertical borders like the classic Mexican Saltillos, but they don’t have horizontal borders.  These are replaced by stripes.Saltilo vert

We call this first group “vertically dominated”.  They have the vertically oriented background designs of the classic Saltillo, but do not have a central diamond.Saltillo w BG yarn

Others have a central diamond that seem to radiate to the ends.

My beautiful pictureSome have a central diamond and dispersed elements that make up the background of the piece.  Some of these have no vertical borders at all.

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There are pieces with the dispersed element field, a center diamond, and big corner elements.

The Old Warping Mill

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This is a picture of Jake O. Trujillo finishing up a warp on his warping mill which was kept in the attic of Irvin’s grandmother’s house.  This picture was taken in the early 1980’s, but he had built the mill soon after he built his loom in 1927.  He’s removing the warp from the mill, “chaining” it up to bring it to his loom across the road.

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This is a picture taken a few years later of Irvin and Hosana Eilert putting a chained warp on a loom.  The challenge is to have every thread across the warp to be the same length and the same tension.  This is critical to the integrity of every weaving produced from the warp.  Warping a loom this way isn’t easy.  When warping wide looms this way in years gone by, Jake would ask for help, and the three of us warped as a team of three.  I don’t remember us being a happy team, but we worked together and we got the work done.

Our weavers are accustomed to having warps made for them.  They bring us their warp beams and we fill them with warp.  This is the way the weaving dealers in Chimayo have been working for many years.  We need those warps to be long, and to be perfectly even in tension.  Any errors in warping will mean that we have weavings that won’t lay flat and aren’t very useful.  The tie industry of the late 1930’s introduced industrial-type warping techniques that were adopted by the early Chimayo weaving dealers.  The technique used was to make a sectional warp on a horizontal mill and transfer that warp directly to a warp beam.  The weaver can then take that warp beam to the loom for weaving.

Between the times when these first two pictures were taken, we moved the mill from the attic across the street to the yarn storage room of the shop.  Irvin modified the mill by adding spokes and crosspieces.  He also built in a braking system, and mounts for a tension box and a wide variety of warp beams.

placing-the-beginning-of-section-on-nail-in-warping-millThe steps to the process are as follows.

Sixteen cones (called a buñuelo) of warp are set up on a cone rack and threaded through the tension box.  We weave at eight ends per inch, so sixteen threads will make two inches of warp.

We create a cross at the beginning of each of our two inch bouts.  If you are familiar with making a “chained” warp, you are creating that cross with the figure 8 at each end of the warp.  This is done here by pulling the bout against a small section of rigid heddle reed mounted in the tension box to separate every other thread.  The cross is held in place by two lease strings (purple threads in the picture) that pass from one side of the mill to the other.  The cross will be our essential guide to the sequence of threads in the warp when we go to tie the warp to the old warp on the loom, or thread the warp through heddles and reed.  The end of the warp that we start with will be buried by the length of warp, but will come out as the accessible end of the warp once it has been wound on to the beam.

The bout is as long as the warp needs to be.  So a warp is ten turns long, or 15, or 20 turns.  It’s critical that the count is right, that each bout is the same number of turns, so that we don’t reach the end of the warp and find some sections longer or shorter than others.

The end of each bout is tied onto a nail that is inserted into the mill’s crosspiece.  As you can see in the left this picture, it’s the same crosspiece where we started the bout.

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Each 2″ bout is wound on the mill all the way across the warp.  The tension box must be moved for each bout, so that it is aligned with the right section on the mill. The warp on the mill in this picture has 20 bouts for a 40″ warp.

 

 

 

 

 

beaming-warpNow we bring the warp beam to the mill.  Because we warp a lot of different beams with a lot of different widths and different axles, Irvin has designed a very flexible system to accommodate them all.   What matters is that the warp beam is perfectly aligned with where the warp is wound on the mill.  We use flanges on our warp beams that keep the warp at a specific width.  As long as the beam is aligned correctly with the warp, it will distribute itself evenly across that width as it winds onto the beam.  If it is incorrectly aligned it will catch on the flanges, potentially breaking threads.

Before we start winding the warp onto the beam we apply a brake to the mill.  What we designed as a brake is essentially a wide rubber band with weights tied to the end that limits the rotation of the mill.  Winding onto the beam requires a great deal of effort and some patience.  But if it all has gone right in making the warp it will provide weeks or even years of perfectly-tensioned warp for creating beautiful things with.

Negotiate, Navigate, Innovate: Strategies Folk Artists Use in Today’s Global Market Place

We were honored to be a part of the Gallery of Conscience at the Museum of International Folk Art.  It was a large investment of time spent with a cadre of New Mexican and international artists, over  the space of several months.  It has been difficult to communicate what we were doing during that time, but the Museum’s website explains.  “The Gallery of Conscience is an experimental gallery in the Museum of International Folk Art where the public is invited to help shape the content and form of the exhibition in real time.

Visitors notice the Gallery of Conscience looks different than the rest of the museum.  In this gallery, visitors are invited behind the scenes to participate directly in the creation of an exhibition.  That is why the space looks informal and unpolished- it’s on purpose.  The Gallery of Conscience team seeks to make visitors feel welcome to write comments, leave thoughts and participate in the exhibition’s creation.

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Negotiate, Navigate, Innovate is about contemporary folk artists and their relationship with their patrons, buyers and collectors. We are especially interested in understanding the pressures they might feel to keep their traditions alive in the face of modern technological advances and new consumer demands. Visitors will see a kind of “mock up” or series of idea sketches. The artworks will come at a later point in the process- after we have heard from visitors, artists and local community members.  Even the exhibition title itself is up for grabs- so be sure to vote on which title you like best, or suggest your own. Come back often and see how the exhibition has changed in response to your ideas.”

There were a number of opportunities for us to interact with the other artists involved.  We also were encouraged to take on an apprentice and create a video documentation of the experience.  That is what you see above.  These experiences have given me a lot to think about over the last several months, and I’ve been anxious to record my thoughts.

About selling traditional arts in a big, well-connected world.

Obviously there are countless approaches.  We were all involved in one of the big summer markets in Santa Fe: the International Folk Art Market, the Spanish Market, and Indian Market.  So we all were aware that there were people who decided who was in, and who was out, of these venues.  It’s not easy to be allowed to show in any of these, there are rules involved, and policies to navigate.  We talked a lot about interacting with the buyers of the products we made, and how those interactions affected our work, and how it affected us on a personal level.

Most interesting to me was how our selling of our work influenced how we understood our traditions.   A list of questions I’d like to explore further in the future, emerges.

  • What do our traditions mean to our community?

Some traditional arts are essential threads of connection in communities.  Others are more pragmatic expressions of comfort, communication, or personal expression.

  • What is the economic role they play? Is it serving to empower community members by providing employment, a creative outlet for self expression, or a role in a community’s sacred interactions?

This is, of course, a question of survival for these art forms.  We met women from countries where creating these goods for sale served as a vital connection to others beyond the walls of their homes.  And their cooperatives created leaders who played essential political roles as voices of the women involved.  For many artists, these forms connected them to their personal and community histories.  Others created objects that were important to a spiritual community beyond themselves.  Some traditions, like ours, have always been primarily in a commercial realm, created for trade beyond the local community.

  • Does it inform and express culture to those within the culture,  or to outsiders?

What I think I heard in our discussions is that this was a very personal question, and how we communicated with those who were interested in our work was at the heart of this.  Who we sold to could be only people who were sincerely committed to the art form or the community, or it could be anybody willing to pay for the product.

  • What about the traditions are sacrosanct and what is changeable?  Are we comfortable with new techniques or different materials, and why?

Again, this is a very personal issue.  But some folks dealt with rules imposed by others regarding what is defined as traditional and what is not.  And others were faced with choices as to how to respond to pressure to make change.  Sometimes change meant making a markedly improved product, like drum heads not damaged by changes in humidity.  Other times market changes might mean using color to appeal in a new market in a way that might go against the community of origin’s intentional use of color.  There were new approaches that helped speed up the process and make it less work intensive, and there was clearly some conflict over the appropriateness of that kind of change too.

  • Do we make changes because of the pressures of outside economic forces?

These forces seem likely to continue to affect these traditional forms, but individuals may choose where they will bend and where they will not.

  • How do we respond to “cultural appropriation”?  And what is our appropriate role in guarding traditions?  Who “owns” these traditions?

As a person who grew up outside of the culture whose weaving tradition I am devoted to preserving, this is a very personal question.  I don’t have any answers to this one.  But I confront it regularly.

In the end, each one of us has to draw boundaries for ourselves, and these questions can help guide our choices.  These are issues that we are often deeply emerged in, and the answers for us have probably grown more nuanced as we have been at this for some time now.  But it was the work we did with our apprentices, and the videos that were made to document that work, that brought me to one conclusion.  Traditions will, and must, change over time.  They are in flux because new people must take them up in every generation. 


There is still an underlying question too, about who supports these traditions, and why, and how.  We have always had moral, if not a lot of financial, support from institutions of various kinds, some governmental and some private.  We are always grateful when these kinds of acknowledgements of the value of tradition are made.  It would be impossible to measure what these things have meant to our ability to keep up our efforts.

Another thing I will always be grateful for about getting to engage with all these artists in this program is that it engenders a sense of common ground and unity of purpose. Each of our opportunities to share with one another were seriously uplifting.  I don’t think I am alone in feeling that way.  For me that is a powerful spiritual thing.

 

 

This was the group of artists and staff who stuck around after the videos were premiered at the end of our project.

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This was a group of us deeply involved in learning how to make videos.  I am grateful for the immersion in a whole new creative process, and hope to apply what I have learned to future projects.

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Always Greener

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Always Greener came out of my developing awareness of how the two sides of tapestry weaving, pictorial and geometric, relate to each other.  It always seems like there’s just a shade of jealousy about “the other side” having it easier, either making or selling their work, or just getting respect for it.  And I really am uncomfortable with any kind of “us versus them” mentality.

This piece was about taking naturalistic shapes and making them geometric.  It’s about how they relate to each other.  So I revisited this body shape that I’d done in a handful of pieces before.  And I let the bodies do things.  They float, they play with the lines that encompass them, and they turn into geometric shapes.  I was told that the upper right body is doing something akin to “downward dog.” I even divided bodies up for their geometric components.

It was woven in 2000.  It uses all natural dyes,  and it’s here in the shop at the moment on consignment from the owner.

Clearly we are solidly in the camp of geometric tapestry weavers.  Pictorials have been around in our tradition, but, other than things like thunderbirds and roadrunners, haven’t really been a big part of it.  It isn’t that our techniques aren’t amenable to imagery, but they really are very much designed around things like symmetry and pattern, and our techniques train our brains around logical thinking that just doesn’t much apply to naturalistic forms.  These thought process are certainly a big part of what I like so much about weaving.

Weaving imagery requires having something to say in imagery.  That “picture painting a thousand words” thing is something I have always found mildly intimidating.  And I’m sure I’d always have the nagging sense that maybe just painting it would be faster and more appropriate for whatever I would want to say with an image.

And once, a few years after I completed this weaving, I was told that what we do wasn’t actually tapestry weaving.  She had learned a different kind of methodology and apparently couldn’t mentally encompass what we do as being tapestry, despite the fact that it very much fits the definition of tapestry.

So, in my mind, getting respect for tapestry as an art form is challenging for all of us.  I’ve watched people talk about it as an issue, a challenge, for tapestry artists, but I don’t have any answers as to how such a thing is ever going to come about.  I know that there are tapestry weavers that promote their work really well, so I guess it could happen that someday a tapestry weaver, or a few really great ones, will push the envelope of artistic respect beyond where it sits today.  I don’t know that there’s any reason to think that geometric forms or traditional design should be any more or less likely to garner respect for tapestry than imagery or boundary pushing new tapestry forms.

I’ve heard from pictorial weavers that those of us weaving in a tradition have it made, that we have an already developed market.  Which is, sort of, true.  But I’d argue that, as individual artists, we have to build a market for our work in precisely the same way that any other artist does.  Our work has some credibility as an authentic outcome of an old tradition.  I wouldn’t say that that was really a simple thing to achieve, but it is something that adds value to our work based on work done by those that have gone before.  So maybe they have a good point there.

 

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Jake Trujillo’s Navy Experience

JakeatTreasureIslandThis is from a transcript of an old oral history interview with Irvin Trujillo’s father Jake. It’s a nice thing to have run into today, on Veteran’s Day. When we went to go find a picture of Jake in the Navy we found this picture, which is dated (at the bottom of the picture) November 11, 1944. A lot of Veteran’s Day coincidence.
“In 1942, I was called into the army, I was inducted.  Well when I got my induction papers, I went over to Santa Fe.  At that time my oldest brother was working in Santa Fe.  He was a cook in one of the restaurants there.  And I went over and told him that I had received my papers and he says ” Why don’t you g0 and enlist in the Navy. It’s a better branch. I see the sailors here and I know that are having a lot of fun. It’s a good branch of the service.”  So I went to the Navy induction center and asked them if I could enlist in the navy and they said yes, if you pass the physical exam. So I passed the test and they told me “Report here in two weeks, you’ll be in the navy. S0 I reported there and they sent me to San Diego, California for training. After boot camp they sent me overseas. From San Diego they sent me to San Francisco, and from there to Portland, Oregon. From there they assigned us a ship in the Merchant Marines, a ship, a gun crew of 25 sailors. I didn’t do any weaving during that-period. We were going from Seattle to Alaska, back and forth delivering supplies on a Liberty Ship.  We were taking the supplies to the fighting men in Alaska.  I made about six voyages. Then I had time to come home on leave. Then I reported back to Treasure Island, and from there they gave me shore duty for about four months. I used to work in the offices as a messenger.  After four months I requested if I could be assigned to go to South America. He said sure, so he gave me an assignment to go overseas. So I went from San Francisco to the South Pacific and unloaded there.  From there they sent us to Antipavasta (?) Chili, and to the Panama Canal, and they from there we landed on the USS Virginia. ’When we got there I had a telegram for me to report to Treasure Island for a special assignment. When I reported there I thought they would send me to the fighting. But they invited me into the office and were asking me a lot of questions and they finally said”We have checked your records and found you have been an instructor in arts and crafts. we need you to teach the sailors the different crafts that you know. You will be in charge of the place here. We will authorize you to purchase whatever you need” I thought it was great. I stayed there for about two to three years 44 and 45.”

 

Fall’s Colors

Every fall I struggle with the onset of cold weather. I don’t know if we work harder to keep warm than other people do, but it really is a long hard slog through the long winter months. And as the temperatures drop, the anticipation of that effort distracts me from the beauty that the season brings. In an effort to keep myself in the present, I can go out and take pictures of the glories of the season.

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Apricot tree at the watergate.
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From the garden up to the tree across the ditch.
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In the corral, where there are pallets that are falling apart.
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On the fence in the arroyo.
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The willow umbrella is on the wall for the winter.
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Virginia Creeper

Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts 2015

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New Mexico is, without a doubt, just packed with art and artists.  People move to New Mexico to pursue their artistic passions, and those who live here all know people who eke out some kind of living as creative souls.  I think that this place really is different than other places in that way.  So it isn’t a surprise that over the years our Governors have awarded recognition to small groups of artists.  This year Irvin Trujillo was so honored.  That’s Governor Susana Martinez standing next to Irvin in the back row in this picture.

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Irvin has received honorifics before, but he continues to be surprised when they come to him. This award is one that he was aware of long ago, when his father was nominated for it repeatedly. His father never was honored by the Governor. This makes this award a little bit of a bittersweet experience for Irvin, as he has always regarded his father as a great master of weaving. 20150918_191903[1]

It was an even more memorable event because we were able to celebrate with the whole family!